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Peter Wilson

Peter Wilson is a singer/songwriter based in Melbourne, Australia. He first came to notice in early 1994 with the song "I Wanna Dance", a staple in the early days of Hitz-FM, where it regularly reached the no. 1 spot in the nightly countdown of songs voted by listeners. Several singles followed: "Move" later in 1994 (the video clip was played several times on Video Hits), and a danced-up cover of the Benny Mardones classic "Into The Night" in 1995.

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Rihanna

Robyn Rihanna Fenty, known by her stage name, Rihanna, is a Bajan singer. Her song 'Umbrella' was one of the highest-selling songs of 2007 and her 3rd album "Good Girl Gone Bad" was critically acclaimed, helping propel her to superstar status. She has attained seven Billboard Hot 100 number ones thus far and is the second Bajan artist to win a Grammy Award. She is also a cultural ambassador for Barbados.

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Diana Anaid

Diana Anaid kick started her musical career by making her self titled debut album and sending a copy to the national Australian youth radio network Triple J. The radio station picked up on the albums first track “I Go Off” and began playing it with an immediate response from the listening audience across the country. Diana’s first album, released through independent record label Origin Recordings in Australia. Diana was nominated as “Best Female Performer” for the 2000 ARIA awards (Australian Grammy’s).

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Bambino Koresh

Bambino Koresh
is a three-piece indie pop explosion band from Sydney,
Australia led by charismatic Argentinian/Spanish singer and guitar player
Leticia Nischang. Previously in bands such as Sneeze, The GiveGoods, 120
Mins and Sweet Thing, Nischang has a thoroughly original guitar technique
which appears to be both technically advanced and naive at the same time.
Playing bass is a certified member of Australia’s indie rock royal family, Tom

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Basement Jaxx

Basement Jaxx is a critically acclaimed English house music duo comprised of Felix Buxton and Simon Ratcliffe that rose to popularity in the late 1990s. Basement Jaxx started in Brixton, South London, UK in 1994, where they held a regular club night called Rooty, which would later become the name of their second artist album (Rooty). In addition to Rooty, their other albums include Kish Kash, Remedy, The Singles, Crazy Itch Radio and Scars.

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Randy Newman

Randall Stuart "Randy" Newman (born November 28, 1943) is a singer/songwriter, arranger, composer, and pianist who is notable for his mordant (and often satirical) pop songs and for his many film scores.

Newman is noted for his practice of writing lyrics from the perspective of a character far removed from Newman's own biography. For example, the 1972 song "Sail Away" is written as a slave trader's sales pitch to attract slaves, while the narrator of "Political Science" is a U.S. nationalist who complains of worldwide ingratitude toward America and proposes a brutally ironic final solution. One of his biggest hits, "Short People" was written from the perspective of "a lunatic" who hates short people. Since the 1980s, Newman has worked mostly as a film composer. His film scores include Ragtime, Awakenings, The Natural, Leatherheads, James and the Giant Peach, Meet the Parents, Seabiscuit and The Princess and the Frog. He has scored six Disney-Pixar films: Toy Story, A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters, Inc., Cars and most recently Toy Story 3.

He has been awarded an Academy Award, three Emmys, four Grammy Awards, and the Governor's Award from the Recording Academy. Newman was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2007, Newman was inducted as a Disney Legend.

Newman grew up in a musical family with Hollywood connections; his uncles Alfred and Lionel both scored numerous films. By age 17, Randy was staff writer for a California music publisher. One semester short of a B.A. in music from UCLA, he dropped out of school. Lenny Waronker, son of Liberty Records’ president, was a close friend and, later, as a staff producer for Warner Bros., helped get Newman signed to the label.

Newman’s early songs were recorded by a number of performers. His friend Harry Nilsson recorded an entire album with Newman on piano, Nilsson Sings Newman, in 1970. Judy Collins (“I Think It’s Going to Rain Today”), Peggy Lee (“Love Story”), and Three Dog Night - for whom “Mama Told Me (Not to Come)” hit #1 - all enjoyed success with Newman’s music.

Newman became a popular campus attraction when touring with Nilsson. His status as a cult star was affirmed by his critically praised debut, Randy Newman, in 1968, which featured his own complex arrangements for full orchestra, and later by 1970’s 12 Songs. He also sang “Gone Dead Train” on the soundtrack of Performance (1970). Live and Sail Away were Newman’s first commercial successes, but his audience has been limited to some degree because his songs are often colored by his ironic, pointed sense of humor, which is rarely simple and frequently misunderstood.

Good Old Boys, for example, was a concept album about the South, with the lyrics expressing the viewpoint of white Southerners. Lyrics such as “We’re rednecks, and we don’t know our ass from a hole in the ground” made people wonder whether Newman was being satirical or sympathetic. He toured (to Atlanta and elsewhere) behind the album with a full orchestra that played his arrangements and was conducted by his uncle Emil Newman.

Little Criminals, in 1977, contained Newman’s first hit single, “Short People,” which mocked bigotry and was taken seriously by a vocal offended minority. “Baltimore” from that album was covered by Nina Simone. Following that album’s release, Newman toured for the first time since 1974. He claimed that in the interim he’d done nothing but watch television and play with his three sons. In 1979 his Born Again featured guest vocals by members of the Eagles. In 1981 Newman composed the soundtrack for the film Ragtime (the first of many soundtrack assignments) and was nominated for two Oscars (Best Song, Best Score). His 1983 album, Trouble in Paradise, included guest appearances by Linda Ronstadt, members of Fleetwood Mac, and Paul Simon, who sang a verse of “The Blues.” That album’s “I Love L.A.” became something of an anthem, thanks in part to a flashy music video directed by Newman’s cousin, Tim Newman (who went on to shoot popular videos for ZZ Top, among others). Land of Dreams (#80, 1988) spawned a minor hit in “It’s Money That Matters” (#60, 1988). It would take Newman 10 more years to make another studio album, 1999’s critically acclaimed Bad Love. With that record peaking at #194, he continues to meet his biggest success in Hollywood, where he spent most of the ’90s becoming one of the town’s most sought-after film composers. Although the material on his own records is literate and biting, the songs he writes for movies are decidedly simpler and with a sunnier outlook - and they usually meet with more success. Both “I Love to See You Smile” from Parenthood and “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2, for instance, were nominated for Oscars; in 1998 alone, Newman garnered three Oscar nominations for three different movies.

In 1995 Newman wrote a musical adaptation of Goethe’s Faust. Both the play and the accompanying CD (which featured guests such as Bonnie Raitt, Linda Ronstadt, Elton John, Don Henley, and James Taylor in the role of God) were commercially unsuccessful. In 2000 he received the Billboard Century Award. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply.

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Blondie

Blondie is perhaps the most commercially successful band to emerge from the 1970s punk scene. They formed in New York in 1974. The original lineup consisted of Clem Burke (drums / percussion), Jimmy Destri (keyboards), Debbie Harry (vocals), Chris Stein (guitar / bass guitar) and Gary Valentine (bass guitar / guitar). Blondie released their first album Blondie in 1976. The album was mildly successful and spawned the Australian hit single "In The Flesh".

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Passion Pit

Passion Pit is an electronic band which formed in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States in 2007. They consist of Michael Angelakos (vocals, keyboards), Ian Hultquist (keyboards, guitar), Ayad Al Adhamy (synth, samples), Jeff Apruzzese (bass, keyboard) and Nate Donmoyer (drums). "Passion Pit" was a vocabulary word used in a class Mike took in school. It's a slang word for a drive-in movie theatre where kids used to go to make out.

Dave Stewart

David A. Stewart is most renown as a member of the succesfull 80's pop duo Eurythmics, together with Annie Lennox. The duo split in the early 1990s and reunited for one album, Peace, and subsequent tour in 1999, as well as for two bonus tracks for the greatest hits compilation Ultimate Collection in 2005.
Even before the Eurythmics split, Stewart worked as a producer and writer with other artists; this work yielded the hit singles Don't Come Around Here No More by Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers and Lily Was Here by Dutch saxophonist Candy Dulfer.

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