Soundtrack | Musicosity

Soundtrack

Daredevil

In mid 1998 the live music scene in Sydney, Australia sucked!! Rock bands were replaced by indie noodling and angst ridden grunge burnouts who would never admit to loving rock moves or monster lickage. The fools. It was around this time Troy Scerri, Charlie O'Neill and Dave Tomley began to assemble a band with a desire to play the kind of music they listened to at home, but found it impossible to find on the live circuit. They recruited the brutal Mark Mills and doom lord Jason Breitfuss and =DAREDEVIL= evolved.

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Urge Overkill

Urge Overkill are an alternative rock band from Chicago that attracted underground attention in the late 80s and early 90s. While their ironic reshaping of 70's arena and glam rock left them marginalized during the height of grunge, they managed to appear on the charts with their cover of the Neil Diamond classic "Girl, You'll Be A Woman Soon" from the Pulp Fiction soundtrack, which hit #50 on the US Charts, and #11 on the Modern Rock charts.

Richard Tognetti

Richard Tognetti (born 4 August 1965) is an Australian violinist, composer and conductor. He was born in Canberra and raised in Wollongong. He is currently Artistic Director and Leader of the Australian Chamber Orchestra. Tognetti studied at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music with Alice Waten and undertook post-graduate study at the Berne Conservatory with Igor Ozim, where he was awarded the Tschumi prize in 1989.

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Goblin

Goblin was an <a href="http://www.last.fm/place/italy">Italian</a> <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/progressive%20rock" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">progressive rock</a> band who were known for their soundtracks on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dario_Argento" rel="nofollow">Dario Argento</a> films (e.g. Deep Red of 1975 a.k.a. Profondo Rosso and Suspiria of 1977). They were initially named <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Cherry+Five" class="bbcode_artist">Cherry Five</a> and were influenced by <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Genesis" class="bbcode_artist">Genesis</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/King+Crimson" class="bbcode_artist">King Crimson</a>. Their early work spawned one progressive rock record named after the band, until they were called in as replacements for <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/composer" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">composer</a> <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Giorgio+Gaslini" class="bbcode_artist">Giorgio Gaslini</a>, who had left the film Profondo Rosso after a conflict with director Dario Argento. They changed their name to Goblin and rewrote most of the score, including the famous main theme.

Yann Tiersen

Yann Tiersen (born June 23, 1970 in Brest, Brittany, France) has been honing his musical aesthetic since he could stand on two legs. He started learning piano at the age of four, taking up violin at the age of six and receiving classical training at musical academies in Rennes, Nantes and Boulogne. Then, at the age of 13, he chose to alter his destiny, breaking his violin into pieces, buying a guitar and forming a rock band.

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Randy Newman

Randall Stuart "Randy" Newman (born November 28, 1943) is a singer/songwriter, arranger, composer, and pianist who is notable for his mordant (and often satirical) pop songs and for his many film scores.

Newman is noted for his practice of writing lyrics from the perspective of a character far removed from Newman's own biography. For example, the 1972 song "Sail Away" is written as a slave trader's sales pitch to attract slaves, while the narrator of "Political Science" is a U.S. nationalist who complains of worldwide ingratitude toward America and proposes a brutally ironic final solution. One of his biggest hits, "Short People" was written from the perspective of "a lunatic" who hates short people. Since the 1980s, Newman has worked mostly as a film composer. His film scores include Ragtime, Awakenings, The Natural, Leatherheads, James and the Giant Peach, Meet the Parents, Seabiscuit and The Princess and the Frog. He has scored six Disney-Pixar films: Toy Story, A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters, Inc., Cars and most recently Toy Story 3.

He has been awarded an Academy Award, three Emmys, four Grammy Awards, and the Governor's Award from the Recording Academy. Newman was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2007, Newman was inducted as a Disney Legend.

Newman grew up in a musical family with Hollywood connections; his uncles Alfred and Lionel both scored numerous films. By age 17, Randy was staff writer for a California music publisher. One semester short of a B.A. in music from UCLA, he dropped out of school. Lenny Waronker, son of Liberty Records’ president, was a close friend and, later, as a staff producer for Warner Bros., helped get Newman signed to the label.

Newman’s early songs were recorded by a number of performers. His friend Harry Nilsson recorded an entire album with Newman on piano, Nilsson Sings Newman, in 1970. Judy Collins (“I Think It’s Going to Rain Today”), Peggy Lee (“Love Story”), and Three Dog Night - for whom “Mama Told Me (Not to Come)” hit #1 - all enjoyed success with Newman’s music.

Newman became a popular campus attraction when touring with Nilsson. His status as a cult star was affirmed by his critically praised debut, Randy Newman, in 1968, which featured his own complex arrangements for full orchestra, and later by 1970’s 12 Songs. He also sang “Gone Dead Train” on the soundtrack of Performance (1970). Live and Sail Away were Newman’s first commercial successes, but his audience has been limited to some degree because his songs are often colored by his ironic, pointed sense of humor, which is rarely simple and frequently misunderstood.

Good Old Boys, for example, was a concept album about the South, with the lyrics expressing the viewpoint of white Southerners. Lyrics such as “We’re rednecks, and we don’t know our ass from a hole in the ground” made people wonder whether Newman was being satirical or sympathetic. He toured (to Atlanta and elsewhere) behind the album with a full orchestra that played his arrangements and was conducted by his uncle Emil Newman.

Little Criminals, in 1977, contained Newman’s first hit single, “Short People,” which mocked bigotry and was taken seriously by a vocal offended minority. “Baltimore” from that album was covered by Nina Simone. Following that album’s release, Newman toured for the first time since 1974. He claimed that in the interim he’d done nothing but watch television and play with his three sons. In 1979 his Born Again featured guest vocals by members of the Eagles. In 1981 Newman composed the soundtrack for the film Ragtime (the first of many soundtrack assignments) and was nominated for two Oscars (Best Song, Best Score). His 1983 album, Trouble in Paradise, included guest appearances by Linda Ronstadt, members of Fleetwood Mac, and Paul Simon, who sang a verse of “The Blues.” That album’s “I Love L.A.” became something of an anthem, thanks in part to a flashy music video directed by Newman’s cousin, Tim Newman (who went on to shoot popular videos for ZZ Top, among others). Land of Dreams (#80, 1988) spawned a minor hit in “It’s Money That Matters” (#60, 1988). It would take Newman 10 more years to make another studio album, 1999’s critically acclaimed Bad Love. With that record peaking at #194, he continues to meet his biggest success in Hollywood, where he spent most of the ’90s becoming one of the town’s most sought-after film composers. Although the material on his own records is literate and biting, the songs he writes for movies are decidedly simpler and with a sunnier outlook - and they usually meet with more success. Both “I Love to See You Smile” from Parenthood and “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2, for instance, were nominated for Oscars; in 1998 alone, Newman garnered three Oscar nominations for three different movies.

In 1995 Newman wrote a musical adaptation of Goethe’s Faust. Both the play and the accompanying CD (which featured guests such as Bonnie Raitt, Linda Ronstadt, Elton John, Don Henley, and James Taylor in the role of God) were commercially unsuccessful. In 2000 he received the Billboard Century Award. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply.

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Into the Woods

Into The Woods may refer to
1. female-fronted rock/metal band
2. a Melbourne folk band It may also be an incorrect artist tag for a musical by Stephen Sondheim. 1. Formed in 2006 by Mike Watchorn and Alex 'Gooders' Goodwin from the ashes of previous projects. Over the course of the first year ITW gathered members for the remaining positions in the band and got down to writing, rehearsing and promotion ahead of its release.

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Nobuo Uematsu

Nobuo Uematsu (Born March 21, 1959) is best known for his composition for the Squaresoft (now Square Enix) games company throughout the 1980s and 1990s, most notably on the Final Fantasy series of games. Composing all his work on the keyboards, he has been hailed as one of the most popular and beloved composers of video game soundtracks. Uematsu enjoyed commercial success with the track “Eyes on Me” from Final Fantasy VIII, performed by Hong Kong singer Faye Wong (Wang Fei - 王菲).

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Band Of Brothers

From the series Band of Brothers Based on the men in 101st Airborne who fought together to stop the Nazi onslaught during World War II and became one of the most higly decorated units to have ever served anywhere.

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