piano

Caverns

There are two known artists sharing the same name. 1. An instrumental progressive group from the United States 2. An underground black metal project from the United States
1. Caverns are an instrumental progressive/math rock trio from Washington D.C. with a prominent piano sound. The line-up consists of Patrick Taylor (piano), Kevin Hillard (guitar) and Ross Hurt (drums). They only have a myspace: http://www.myspace.com/caverns

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Randy Newman

Randall Stuart "Randy" Newman (born November 28, 1943) is a singer/songwriter, arranger, composer, and pianist who is notable for his mordant (and often satirical) pop songs and for his many film scores.

Newman is noted for his practice of writing lyrics from the perspective of a character far removed from Newman's own biography. For example, the 1972 song "Sail Away" is written as a slave trader's sales pitch to attract slaves, while the narrator of "Political Science" is a U.S. nationalist who complains of worldwide ingratitude toward America and proposes a brutally ironic final solution. One of his biggest hits, "Short People" was written from the perspective of "a lunatic" who hates short people. Since the 1980s, Newman has worked mostly as a film composer. His film scores include Ragtime, Awakenings, The Natural, Leatherheads, James and the Giant Peach, Meet the Parents, Seabiscuit and The Princess and the Frog. He has scored six Disney-Pixar films: Toy Story, A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters, Inc., Cars and most recently Toy Story 3.

He has been awarded an Academy Award, three Emmys, four Grammy Awards, and the Governor's Award from the Recording Academy. Newman was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2007, Newman was inducted as a Disney Legend.

Newman grew up in a musical family with Hollywood connections; his uncles Alfred and Lionel both scored numerous films. By age 17, Randy was staff writer for a California music publisher. One semester short of a B.A. in music from UCLA, he dropped out of school. Lenny Waronker, son of Liberty Records’ president, was a close friend and, later, as a staff producer for Warner Bros., helped get Newman signed to the label.

Newman’s early songs were recorded by a number of performers. His friend Harry Nilsson recorded an entire album with Newman on piano, Nilsson Sings Newman, in 1970. Judy Collins (“I Think It’s Going to Rain Today”), Peggy Lee (“Love Story”), and Three Dog Night - for whom “Mama Told Me (Not to Come)” hit #1 - all enjoyed success with Newman’s music.

Newman became a popular campus attraction when touring with Nilsson. His status as a cult star was affirmed by his critically praised debut, Randy Newman, in 1968, which featured his own complex arrangements for full orchestra, and later by 1970’s 12 Songs. He also sang “Gone Dead Train” on the soundtrack of Performance (1970). Live and Sail Away were Newman’s first commercial successes, but his audience has been limited to some degree because his songs are often colored by his ironic, pointed sense of humor, which is rarely simple and frequently misunderstood.

Good Old Boys, for example, was a concept album about the South, with the lyrics expressing the viewpoint of white Southerners. Lyrics such as “We’re rednecks, and we don’t know our ass from a hole in the ground” made people wonder whether Newman was being satirical or sympathetic. He toured (to Atlanta and elsewhere) behind the album with a full orchestra that played his arrangements and was conducted by his uncle Emil Newman.

Little Criminals, in 1977, contained Newman’s first hit single, “Short People,” which mocked bigotry and was taken seriously by a vocal offended minority. “Baltimore” from that album was covered by Nina Simone. Following that album’s release, Newman toured for the first time since 1974. He claimed that in the interim he’d done nothing but watch television and play with his three sons. In 1979 his Born Again featured guest vocals by members of the Eagles. In 1981 Newman composed the soundtrack for the film Ragtime (the first of many soundtrack assignments) and was nominated for two Oscars (Best Song, Best Score). His 1983 album, Trouble in Paradise, included guest appearances by Linda Ronstadt, members of Fleetwood Mac, and Paul Simon, who sang a verse of “The Blues.” That album’s “I Love L.A.” became something of an anthem, thanks in part to a flashy music video directed by Newman’s cousin, Tim Newman (who went on to shoot popular videos for ZZ Top, among others). Land of Dreams (#80, 1988) spawned a minor hit in “It’s Money That Matters” (#60, 1988). It would take Newman 10 more years to make another studio album, 1999’s critically acclaimed Bad Love. With that record peaking at #194, he continues to meet his biggest success in Hollywood, where he spent most of the ’90s becoming one of the town’s most sought-after film composers. Although the material on his own records is literate and biting, the songs he writes for movies are decidedly simpler and with a sunnier outlook - and they usually meet with more success. Both “I Love to See You Smile” from Parenthood and “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2, for instance, were nominated for Oscars; in 1998 alone, Newman garnered three Oscar nominations for three different movies.

In 1995 Newman wrote a musical adaptation of Goethe’s Faust. Both the play and the accompanying CD (which featured guests such as Bonnie Raitt, Linda Ronstadt, Elton John, Don Henley, and James Taylor in the role of God) were commercially unsuccessful. In 2000 he received the Billboard Century Award. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply.

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Ball Park Music

In 2006, Ball Park Music began to crawl as an uneventful solo adventure for singer/songwriter Samuel Cromack. In the eighth year of the Naughties, equipped with a little collection of songs, his adventure took him to Brisbane. At a serendipitous pool-party he encountered Daniel Hanson, Dean Hanson, Paul Furness, Brock Smith and Jennifer Boyce: five of the most talented and delightful musicians...EVER!

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Anthony Pateras

Anthony Pateras (b.1979) is a multidisciplinary musician living and working in Melbourne, Australia. Solo, he appears on piano or analogue electronics, and composes written works for ensembles, orchestras and soloists. His main bands are Pateras/Baxter/Brown freeform acoustic noise-jazz, an electro-acoustic duo with Robin Fox, the free-grind project PIVIXKI (with Max Kohane) and noise sculptors POLETOPRA (with Marco Fusinato).

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Sara Bareilles

Sara Beth Bareilles (born December 7, 1979) is a Grammy-nominated American singer-songwriter and pianist. Bareilles was born and raised in Eureka, California, United States. After graduating from UCLA in 2002, Bareilles performed at local bars and clubs. She issued two demos of mostly live tracks in 2003: The First One in April and The Summer Sessions in October. In January 2004, Bareilles released her first studio album, Careful Confessions.

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Sergei Rachmaninov

Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninov (Russian: Сергей Васильевич Рахманинов, Sergej Vasil’evič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 [O.S. 20 March] – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He was one of the finest pianists of his day and, as a composer, the last great representative of Russian late Romanticism in classical music. Early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov and other Russian composers gave way to a thoroughly personal idiom which included a pronounced lyricism, expressive breadth, structural ingenuity and a tonal palette of rich, distinctive orchestral colors.[1]

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Hiromi

Hiromi Uehara (上原ひろみ, born 26 March 1979) is a Japanese jazz composer and pianist. She is known for her virtuosic technique, energetic live performances and blend of jazz with other musical genres such as progressive rock, classical and fusion in her compositions. She performs as a trio alongside bassist Tony Grey and drummer Martin Valihora. On October 19, 2006, the trio added guitarist David Fiuczynski (from the Screaming Headless Torsos), to form Hiromi's Sonicbloom.

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Bernd Glemser

Bernd Glemser (born 1962, Dürbheim) is a German pianist. A student of Vitaly Margulis, in 1989 he became Germany's youngest piano professor at Saarbrücken's Musikochschule. He has recorded major pieces by Rachmaninov, Prokofiev, Schumann, Scriabin, and Tchaikovsky. In 2003 Glemser was decorated with the Bundesverdienstkreuz. His recording of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 was featured in Spider-Man 3 (2007).

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The Tealeaves

The Tealeaves sound is inspired by the era of the great singer-songwriters, including Cat Stevens, Simon & Garfunkel and Don McLean. Their music overflows with melody, harmony and lyrical honesty, and has been described as “heart wrenching to say the least”. James, the original leaf, gathered the group together in 2008 to prepare and record their self-titled debut album with eminent producer and engineer, Hadyn Buxton. Traversing a wide range of musical styles, their songs range from harmony filled wall-of-sound band tracks to intimate, melancholy indie-pop.


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Brad Mehldau

Brad Mehldau is an American jazz pianist born on August 23, 1970 in Jacksonville, Florida. He plays original compositions and jazz standards, as well as interpretations of non-jazz songs by The Beatles, Nick Drake, Radiohead and Soundgarden, for example. He has also contributed to movie soundtracks, including Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997), Eyes Wide Shut (1999), Space Cowboys (2000), The Million Dollar Hotel (2000).

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